• mark

Brain Fog ....its a thing!


For nearly two-thirds of women, menopause comes with an undesirable change in memory.


“Brain fog” is not a medical or psychological term. rather it is a lay term that aptly describes the fogginess in thought experienced by many women during menopause.


Menopause related cognitive changes are not just age-related cognitive decline.


Rather, fluctuating and eventual decline of ovarian hormone production associated with menopause is likely to play a key role.


Hormones produced by the ovaries, estradiol (a type of estrogen) and progesterone, are potent brain chemicals that are thought to protect the brain and enhance thinking and memory. The fluctuations and eventual loss of estradiol has been suggested to contribute to cognitive difficulties.


These excerpts are from the article you can read by clicking The Conversation below:

What can help?

The use of hormone therapy does not appear to have a clear benefit on cognitive function (but evidence remains limited). i.e: mixed


Commencing HT within 5 years of onset of menopause symptoms is the "window of opportunity" should you choose to do so and certainly worth discussing with your doctor or qualified practitioner.


Some women can't or choose not to use HT.


For these there is some evidence (again more research be needed) that Chinese herbs may help.


In the study you will find by clicking on the Hindawi image, it was shown Xiao-Yao-San Formula Improves Cognitive Ability by Protecting the Hippocampal Neurons in Ovariectomized Rats


Unsure on how to best approach this for yourself? Consult with a qualified practitioner to discuss what option best suits your needs.


Monash University are currently conducting an online survey for women aged 45 to 60 to better understand cognitive symptoms during menopause.


I invite you to take the time to complete the survey to do your bit for women and science.


Feel free to contact me for further information.






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