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Things that make you go mmmm......


Some of the most esteemed medicinals in Chinese medicine that have been used for thousands of years are mushrooms.


Considered to be the food of the gods by the Romans and referred to as the elixir of life in Chinese culture, science is now confirming that medicinal mushrooms are in fact just that.


Modern science and medical research has found these wonder fungi to contain compounds that can have these effects:

· Anti-diabetic

· Antibiotic

· Anti-parasitic

· Anti-tumor

· Immunomodulating

· Antioxidant

· Radical scavenging

· Cardiovascular

· Anti-hypercholesterolemic

· Antiviral

· Antibacterial

· Antifungal

· Detoxification

· Hepatoprotective


Now one of the funky superfoods, they can also;

· Be rich in antioxidants

· Stabilize the immune system

· Boost brain power

· Help to balance hormones

· Relieve digestive problems


So what are the best and how do I use them?

1. Reishi (Ling Zhi)

The "mushroom of immortality" Powder / capsule / smoothies etc or soups..


2. Cordyceps ( Dong Chong Xia Cao)

The "caterpillar fungus." Tincture or powder / shakes and teas.


3. Turkey Tail ( Yun Zhi)

One of the most extensively researched of all medicinal mushrooms it has a very mild mushroom flavour and can be made into a simple decoction and drunk as a tea alone.


4. Lion’s Mane (Hóu Tóu Gū)

A highly researched Chinese medicinal mushroom, best known for its ability to support memory. Sauteed or used in cooking. Here's a sample recipe: Lions tale crab cakes.


5. Chaga (Hua Jie Kong Jun)

High levels of melanin give Chaga a dark color and results in it having strong antioxidant and genoprotective effects. Best taken as a tincture.


So get your cook on!

We are what we eat so get your cook on, explore the world of new foods and new recipes and live from your kitchen.




To get you started this guide on using medicinal mushrooms from these peeps has recipes and ideas to get your creative ideas flowing.







References:

Sabaratnam V, Kah-Hui W, Naidu M, Rosie David P. Neuronal health - can culinary and medicinal mushrooms help?. J Tradit Complement Med. 2013;3(1):62-68. doi:10.4103/2225-4110.106549 Read here.


Babitskaia VG, Shcherba VV, Ikonnikova NV. Melaninovyĭ kompleks griba Inonotus obliquus [Melanin complex of the fungus Inonotus obliquus]. Prikl Biokhim Mikrobiol. 2000 Jul-Aug;36(4):439-44. Russian. PMID: 10994193. Read here.


Tuli HS, Sandhu SS, Sharma AK. Pharmacological and therapeutic potential of Cordyceps with special reference to Cordycepin. 3 Biotech. 2014 Feb;4(1):1-12. doi: 10.1007/s13205-013-0121-9. Epub 2013 Feb 19. PMID: 28324458; PMCID: PMC3909570. Read here.


Wachtel-Galor S, Yuen J, Buswell JA, Benzie IFF. Ganoderma lucidum (Lingzhi or Reishi): A Medicinal Mushroom. In: Benzie IFF, Wachtel-Galor S, editors. Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd ed. Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press/Taylor & Francis; 2011. Chapter 9. PMID: 22593926. Read here.


PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet]. Read here.


Lull C, Wichers HJ, Savelkoul HF. Antiinflammatory and immunomodulating properties of fungal metabolites. Mediators Inflamm. 2005;2005(2):63-80. doi:10.1155/MI.2005.63. Read here.


Disclaimer: This article is not intended as medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.


 

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